MISSION (Evangelism) - MAE STREAM

 

This programme is for people who want to think seriously and deeply about the practice of mission and evangelism in our contemporary culture through biblical, historical and theological studies. It is designed for lay or ordained persons, from all traditions. If you are looking for a study programme that will go wide in its grasp of the subject, deep into some key themes, and prepare you for the challenges of our day, then this is the one for you! It can be taken as a full-time or part-time programme and be undertaken at a number of different levels:

 

Postgraduate Certificate in Mission (Evangelism): a one year part-time or one semester full-time course incorporating two units of study;

Postgraduate Diploma in Mission (Evangelism): a one year full-time or two year part-time course incorporating four units of study.

MA in Mission (Evangelism): a one year full-time or two year part-time course incorporating four units of study and a Masters level dissertation of 12–15,000 words.

 

THE AIMS OF THE STREAM

The MA in Mission (Evangelism) aims to:

 

INCLUSIVE DATES OF THE TEACHING BLOCKS

MISSION (Evangelism) – MAE STREAM

2008/2009

8-12 September 2008:          MAE2 Mission, Evangelism and the Kingdom

12 - 16 January 2009:           MAE4 Best Practices in Mission and Evangelism

             

2009/2010

7 - 11 September 2009:        MAE1 Evangelism, Conversion and the Gospel

11 - 15 January 2010:           MAE4 Best Practices in Mission and Evangelism

 

                          

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

There are 3 core units of study for the Mission (Evangelism) stream.  Students choose at least 2 core units for the Mission (Evangelism) stream and up to 2 other units from across the syllabus.

 

2008/09

UNIT MAE2: MISSION, EVANGELISM AND THE KINGDOM

Aims:

This unit seeks to:

  • provide a systematic understanding of biblical and theological models of mission and evangelism in recent scholarship
  • explore critically the development of missiology and its place as a discipline of theology
  • provide a systematic understanding of mission history from the early church to the present day
  • explore critically the various motivations for mission
  • explore critically the historical patterns and paradigms of mission and evangelism that have shaped contemporary missiology and the practices of evangelism
  • develop a richer conceptual understanding of the relationship between evangelism, social caring and the struggle for justice as inseparable components of mission
  • engage in comprehensive reflection upon the radical nature of the church as sign, herald and foretaste of justice in the Kingdom of God

 


Learning Outcomes:

 

On completion of this unit successful students will be able to:

  • make sound judgments about the biblical and theological character of mission and evangelism, and communicate these conclusions to specialists and lay members of the church
  • assess critically different theological models of mission and evangelism, and their significance for the church in different social contexts
  • make sound judgments about the biblical and theological character of missionary activity and communicate these conclusions to specialists and lay members of the church
  • assess critically the different historical epochs and paradigm shifts in mission and evangelism, and their significance for understanding how the church might meet the contemporary challenges of cultural change
  • make sound judgments on the nature of missionary motivation and communicate these conclusions to specialists and lay members of the church
  • draw upon and develop new skills for addressing injustice and human need in the contexts of church life and prophetic participation in the world
  • contribute a deeper understanding of, and new creative practices for, discerning and transforming the social outreach of the church

 

Content:

Major Themes Sub-Topics
The Discipline of Missiology
  • The development of missiology in the 19th and 20th centuries and its current place as a theological discipline
  • Models of mission: missio ecclesiae, missio humanitatis, missio Dei
  • Motivation for mission
History of Mission and Evangelism
  • Key persons and paradigms, moments and movements, in mission history: apostolic, patristic, medieval Catholic, Protestant evangelical and conciliar ecumenical
  • The theology of John Wesley and the practices of early Methodism as a movement of renewal, mission and evangelism
Contemporary Missionary Movements
  • Roman Catholic mission thinking since Vatican II
  • World Council of Churches and the Lausanne Movement
  • Pentecostalism, Evangelicalism and the Charismatic Movement
Mission, Culture and Justice
  • Theological relationship between gospel, church and culture
  • Biblical and theological analysis of mission as evangelism, social caring, and the struggle for justice
  • The evangelical debate on the relationship between evangelism and social action
  • Mission and the Kingdom of God

 

2008/09

UNIT MAE4: BEST PRACTICES IN MISSION AND EVANGELISM

Aims:

This unit seeks to:

  • provide a systematic understanding of personal evangelism and church growth practices
  • explore critically issues relating to short term mission teams
  • develop a richer conceptual understanding of the many different practices by which contemporary Christians seek to live the gospel and invite others to become followers of Jesus Christ
  • explore critically the management of change and the development of mission strategies
  • develop a richer conceptual understanding of world influences and perspectives on mission practices

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

On completion of this unit successful students will be able to:

  • make sound judgments about the biblical and theological character of personal evangelism and church growth practice
  • assess critically different practices for evangelism and church growth, and their significance for understanding how the church might meet future challenges
  • analyse and evaluate issues concerning the management of change and the development of mission strategies
  • contribute a deeper understanding of, and new creative practices for, articulating the gospel
  • analyse and evaluate mission from a world perspective

 

Content:

 

Major Themes

Sub-Topics

Practices of Evangelistic Ministry

The history of practices of personal evangelism

Biblical and theological reflection on personal evangelistic practices including service evangelism, door to door, evangelism explosion and faith sharing

Biblical and theological reflection on programme evangelism including alpha, Christianity explored, crusade/event evangelism,

The future of personal evangelistic practices

Practices of Church Growth

 

The history of practices of church growt

Biblical and theological reflection on contemporary church growth practices including purpose driven church, seeker sensitive church, natural church development, mission audits and mission statements

The future of church growth practices

Managing Mission

Developing mission practice, mission audits and mission statements

The role of missioners, consultants and accompanists

Managing change

The place of para-church organisations

World Perspectives

A global critique of personal and church mission practices

Biblical and theological reflections on short term mission teams

 

 

2009/10

UNIT MAE1: Evangelism, Conversion and the Gospel

Aims:

 

This unit seeks to:

  • provide a systematic understanding of biblical and theological models of evangelism and Christian conversion in recent scholarship
  • explore critically the patterns of decision making and religious commitment arising from current research
  • develop a richer conceptual understanding of the nature and relationship between motives, means and ends in mission and evangelism, and the implications for church life and personal discipleship
  • provide a systematic understanding of communication theory in the service of mission and evangelism
  • engage in comprehensive reflection upon the challenges of making the gospel intelligible, credible and compelling under the shifting intellectual and cultural conditions of postmodernity

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

On completion of this unit successful students will be able to:

  • make sound judgments about the biblical and theological character of Christian conversion, and communicate these conclusions to specialists and lay members of the church
  • assess critically the different historical models of evangelism and conversion, and their significance for the mission of the church today
  • analyse and evaluate current strategies of mission and evangelism.
  • make sound judgments about the biblical and theological character of evangelistic proclamation and communicate these conclusions to specialists and lay members of the church
  • contribute a deeper understanding of, and new creative practices for, articulating the gospel under the scientific, economic and technological conditions of contemporary western society

 

 Content:

Major Themes Sub-Topics
The Theology of Christian Conversion Biblical, historical and theological reflections on conversion: ‘lostness,’ repentance, faith and reconciliation
Finding faith and making disciples
The Theology of Evangelism Biblical foundations for mission and evangelism
Defining the nature of, and relationship between, mission and evangelism
Rethinking mission and evangelism at the end of modernity and under the conditions of postmodernity
Communicating the Gospel Theories of communication, evangelistic preaching, call and response
Use of the arts and media in evangelism
Worship and evangelism; faith sharing; understanding those outside of faith; and personal evangelism
Christian Apologetics in a Postmodern Context Biblical and historical approaches to apologetics
Apologetics under the conditions of modernity and the postmodern challenge
The church as apologetic and plausibility structure: the meaning of authenticity in making the gospel intelligible, credible, and compelling

 

2009/10

UNIT MAE4: BEST PRACTICES IN MISSION AND EVANGELISM

See above

 

UNIT MAE7: DISSERTATION

Aims:

The dissertation unit seeks to:

  • provide an opportunity for creativity and originality in the application of knowledge gained from the programme through independent research and supervised study into a key theme of mission and evangelism
  • demonstrate how a systematic understanding of contemporary theology and culture may be applied to a topic of research in the fields of mission and evangelism
  • develop the conceptual understanding necessary to critically evaluate the current scholarship and methodologies relevant to a specific topic of research
  • cultivate good research skills and habits in preparation for further academic or professional study

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

On completion of this unit/dissertation successful students will be able to:

  • identify and order good research questions in the theology and practice of mission and evangelism
  • assess how complex issues and problems can be analysed and addressed through good research practice
  • demonstrate how research leads to critical arguments and sound judgements which can be clearly communicated to others
  • sustain self-directed study and independent learning in order to continue advancing in their knowledge of, and developing new skills in, the fields of mission and evangelism

 

Content:

 

The entire research project – reading, examining evidence, writing up – is distributed over the whole course of the programme and students are:

 

Assessment:

 
For the Master of Arts Degree, this unit is assessed by a 12-15,000 word dissertation.

 

  

MISSION (Evangelism) DELIVERY 

 

The delivery of tthis stream is via a team of Cliff tutors, programme tutors, and a variety of external lecturers. The core team includes:

 

         Revd Dr Philip Meadows, BSc BA PGCE MA MPhil

         Revd Dr Stephen Skuce, BD MPhil

         Revd Professor Dr David Dunn-Wilson, BA BD MA MPhil

          

In addition to the core team nationally renowned scholars and practitioners in areas relating to the programme provide input into each of the teaching blocks.